I Suck at Phone Interviews…

This picture is not me. Let's not get it twisted. I have never looked this happy before, during, or after a phone interview.

This morning I had a phone interview.  I researched.  I prepped.  I did an almost 2 hour mock interview and got feedback.  All in all, I dedicated about 7 hours to get ready for 25 minutes.  Ultimately, I sucked.

Phone interviews and I don’t mix.  We are like water and oil.  I get off the phone and constantly replay the interview over and over again in my head.  I should have answered that question this way.  Why didn’t I talk about this?  It becomes an endless barrage on myself.  Did I suck that bad?  Maybe.  Maybe not.  I am hard on myself.

I asked my current boss how I did in my phone interview.  She was honest and said it was a good thing she met me in person beforehand.  If that isn’t an indication of sucking at a phone interview then I am not sure what is.

My personality and way I process things does not transfer well to phone interviews.  I need to time to think about things.  I need more than a brief pause to organize my thoughts.  I like to have things ordered.  I like to write things out.  I need to prepare to be most effective.  Phone interviews don’t mesh with what I just explained.

Why do we do it this way?  So I decided to pose the following question to the twittersphere:

“Why don’t we give candidates the questions we ask during phone interviews in advance?  What is the harm?”

I don’t see how giving the interview questions to a candidate in advance is really changing the process.  Think about the jobs we do.  How often are we asked to answer questions without having the opportunity to think about how to respond?  Yes, even when you are asked a question on the spot, you typically have the chance to follow-up afterwards and that is usually the expectation.

So that brings me back to my question.  Why don’t we provide candidates with the interview questions in advance?  What is the harm?

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About Justin Sipes

Learner Input Strategic Achiever Analytical
This entry was posted in Higher Ed, Job Search and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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